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The Human Body

Not related to the human body, but because there are so many meteor showers right now I thought you'd enjoy this!

 

Digestive System:

 

This is the kooky video that we watched in class.  You drag a food over to the mouth and watch how it travels down the digestive tract.  See what gets broken down and absorbed by the body at each step. How your body digests different foods

 

*****If you were not in class when we watched the video above, this one will be easier to start with.

Another video about the digestive system http://kidshealth.org/kid/htbw/_bfs_DSmoviesource.html

 

More reading on the digestive system (if interested)

 

What does each part do?  - move your mouse over each part of the system to see what it is called and what it does.

 

 

Pathway of digestion quiz    try out this self-test and see how you do with remembering the steps of digestion.

Another digestion game

kids digestion search

 

 

Blood and the Bloodmobile:

Today we looked at the make-up of the blood and talked about some of the functions or jobs of the blood in our body. 

  • All of this is summed up in a great song by "They Might Be Giants" called The Bloodmobile.  Watch it again and see if you remember all of the functions it mentions.  Some of these we will return to in more detail as we continue learning about the systems that make up our bodies.
  • Spend some time with the cartoon video below.  It uses lots of terms that you don't need to know, but the general idea of the story is great.  It should give a complete picture about what's happening as the blood moves around your body Cartoon video about the blood and how the heart works.

Cells:  There is another video by the same group that sings about the bloodmobile.  If you're interested it is also fun.

 

Organ systems:

This is the video we watched in class.  It is from the National Geographic and is an overview of some of the systems of the human body.

 

Organs:

  • Organs Game - try this out and see how well you do placing the organs we learned about in class. You will have to rotate them to get them in the proper direction before you can place them.

See if you can correctly place the following:  The heart, stomach, liver, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, lungs.  Try any of the other organs and see how you do!

Skeleton - we did not do anything with the skeleton, but here is a game to play.  Read the instructions and try to put Mr. Bones back together.

 

 

 

 

Simple Machines:

Inclined Planes:

 

 Inclined Plane:  use this website to explore how less force is needed with longer ramps.

 

Which Wedge is Better? - Try the activity with wedges. Which takes more force - a shorter wedge or a longer wedge (you

lengthen and shorten the wedge by dragging the tip of the wedge found in the box under the data table then click the add mass button) ?

 

Edheads Simple Machines - these are great activities to test your understanding of the simple machines we've been studying.  Start in the house, then when you have completed that move to the garage.

If the link above doesn't work, try starting on this page.

 

 

Levers:

We have done a lab in class looking at the lever.  In your activity you found that by moving the fulcrum closer to the load you needed less force to move the load.  Here are some homework activities to further explore the lever, a simple machine.

 

Try to balance Pic and Harry on the see-saw - be patient as it takes a few seconds for them to sort themselves out!

Check out some of these sites/movies about levers, especially levers in your body.

 Try out this lever! 

     1.  Put the fulcrum (the rock) as close to the load (the rectangular block) as possible.  Follow the directions at the site about how to move the fulcrum.  Then move the fulcrum away from the load in short steps, collecting at least 5 data points.

     2.  After you collect your results think about the three questions written in orange:

               a.  As the fulcrum get farther away from the load, what happens to the force Harry needs to move the block? 

               b.  When you move the fulcrum father away from the block of stone (load) what is the  exact distance when Harry can no longer move the block (when the force get too big for him to do the job)?

 

In class we made a first class lever; a lever where the fulcrum is between the force (effort) and the load.  We looked at lots of tools that were different classes/types of levers.

 

Check out this site about levers.

                In a  2nd class lever the load lies between the fulcrum and the force (effort).   An example is a wheelbarrow:  the load lies between the wheel (fulcrum) and the handles (where the force/effort is applied). 

                In a 3rd class lever the force/effort is applied between the fulcrum and the load.  An example is a broom or a hockey stick. 

 

Friction:

Here's a great summary of lots of ideas about motion.  Check out the section on friction and see if it answers any questions for you.

 

Try these Friction activities:

 

Change the surface  Try changing the surface to see how it affects the speed of the car.  Which surface has the least/most friction?  How does the force you use to push the car affect its movement?

 

Explore motion with this fun activity.  You can change the weight of the car, the steepness of the ramp, and introduce extra friction by adding a parachute.  Remember to just change one variable at a time!

 

Here is another friction activity to try.  The goal is to put on the brakes in order to stop a vehicle in a traffic jam.  In it you have a number of different variables (things you can change in the experiment).  You can change the type of vehicle, the speed of the vehicle, the road surface, and the distance at which you apply the brakes.

First try these values:  Big Red Truck, 50 miles per hour, Dry Road, 125 feet away.  You should stop the car.  Now repeat the experiment changing JUST ONE of the values/variables.  What are your results?  Why can't you change more than one thing at a time?

 

Bill Nye Friction Video that we started watching in class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Mummification Experiment:                                                

"Why do we mummify cucumbers in fourth grade science"?

 

If you ask students they will say because it's fun, it's cool, we're studying Egypt in class and Egyptians made mummies.

 

From the teachers' point of view the real core of the activity is experimental design; fourth graders are now at the stage

where they can design and carry out an experiment more independently. 

  • As a class we discuss the role of concepts like variables, controls, data, observation and conclusions.
  • Students are asked to use their knowledge and previous experience with fair tests to design a controlled experiment
  • Students choose a variable, set up a controlled experiment, make and record observations, and collect data over a three week period. 
  • At the end of three weeks we evaluate the mummies and compare results, exploring the concept of why we must use percent change rather than just comparing our raw data.
  • Students write up a comprehensive conclusion (their first "lab report") based on their experimental findings.  Students use the writing process, including pre-writing, multiple drafts and peer editing, to produce their final piece.

 

Explore this:

This is a great scholastic article about Mummifying Pets.  Check out the various links

including the digital article and the power point.

*****Mummy Maker - great interactive site that lets you make a mummy.  Along the way you make decisions about what to remove and what to leave behind, tools to use,....

 

There are lots of fun sites about mummification and Ancient Egypt.

*******The Unknown Mummy  a really fun adventure.  You explore a tomb, collect artifacts and then try to figure out whose tomb you're in!

Minding your Mummies: The Science of Mummification 

HowStuffWorks "Egyptian Mummification"

Write your name in hieroglyphics

Fun site with lots of information about Egypt

The Book of The Dead and document preservation

http://www.akhet.co.uk/mainpage.htm

 

Sustainability Unit:

In-class activity:  food chains and food webs

 

 Food Chains and Food Webs:

 

 

Biomimicry, Form and Function

 

 

Ecological Footprint:

 

Here is the link for the ecological foot print website.

Here the link to the worksheet and the two additional questions.

 

The Lorax:

 

We start our study of sustainability with reading The Lorax and thinking about the organisms that live in the Lorax's environment; their needs and how they are all interconnected in their environment.

 

 

The Lorax is a fictional story, but there are many real-life examples of the same sort of thing happening to forests and animals and plants. 

 

 

Article about the Cuyahoga River on fire.

 

Many commercials were made at the time to try to raise public awareness about the environment.  One of the most famous was called "the Crying Indian".

Companies started to realize that people had questions about how they were treating the environment and so they started to make commercials like this one.

Woodsy Owl tried getting message across to kids with ads like these two:  Woodsy #1Woodsy talking about water pollution

 

 

To  do for homework:

 you do not have to write anything down, but do look at the site and consider the questions asked below:

 

  • Go to Lorax Project  Click on the Forest picture on the left and read about one of the World’s forests. How is it similar to  what we read about in The Lorax?
  • Check out the “What you can do” How many things are you doing already?
  • the info. and friends sections have some interesting information 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HUMAN BODY:

Fun video by They Might Be Giants which introduces DNA and its function in the cell.

 

Extracting DNA from strawberries  - this is a good procedure that we used in Ms. Silverman's class for our extraction.  It only calls for one strawberry, but two is better.  Also, We think that cheesecloth worked better for step #6 than the coffee filter!  After step #8 wait for about 5 minutes before

you try to pick up the DNA.

 

If you want to explore some more videos about cells here are some fun ones:

this is a cell rap.  Don't worry about the names but it gives an idea of what the organelles (remember our organs??) do inside a cell.

Bill Nye the science guy - this is about 20 minutes long and talks about cells

 

Digestive System:

 

This is the kooky video that we watched in class.  You drag a food over to the mouth and watch how it travels down the digestive tract.  See what gets broken down and absorbed by the body at each step. How your body digests different foods

 

*****If you were not in class when we watched the video above, this one will be easier to start with.

Another video about the digestive system http://kidshealth.org/kid/htbw/_bfs_DSmoviesource.html

 

What does each part do?  - move your mouse over each part of the system to see what it is called and what it does.

 

 

Pathway of digestion quiz    try out this self-test and see how you do with remembering the steps of digestion.

Another digestion game

kids digestion search

 

 

Human Body:

The Heart and Lungs (The Circulatory and Respiratory Systems)

 

Amazing Heart Facts

  • Your heart is about the same size as your fist.
  • An average adult body contains about five quarts of blood.
  • All the blood vessels in the body joined end to end would stretch 62,000 miles or two and a half times around the earth.
  • The heart circulates the body's blood supply about 1,000 times each day.
  • The heart pumps the equivalent of 5,000 to 6,000 quarts of blood each day.
 

Amazing Lung Facts

  • At rest, a person breathes about 14 to 16 times per minute. After exercise it could increase to over 60 times per minute.
  • New babies at rest breathe between 40 and 50 times per minute. By age five it decreases to around 25 times per minute.
  • The total surface area of the alveoli (tiny air sacs in the lungs) is the size of a tennis court. 
  • The lungs are the only organ in the body that can float on water.
  • The lungs produce a detergent-like substance which reduces the surface tension of the fluid lining, allowing air in.

 

 

 

The Bloodmobile video:

Today we looked at the make-up of the blood and talked about some of the functions or jobs of the blood in our body. 

All of this is summed up in a great song by "They Might Be Giants" called The Bloodmobile.  Watch it again and see

if you remember all of the functions it mentions.  Some of these we will return to in more detail as we continue learning

about the systems that make up our bodies.

 

Cartoon video about the blood and how the heart works.  Don't be too concerned about all of the terms.  It's the general idea about the route of the blood that is important.

 

 

 

 

Organ systems:

This is the video we watched in class.  It is from the National Geographic and is an overview of some of the systems of the human body.

 

Organs:

  • Organs Game - This will be a challenge as you have to rotate the organs to the correct position before you place them.   Think about the shape and position of the ones we did in class.  You can try others, but we are only focusing on the 7 we did in class.

See if you can correctly place the following:  The heart, stomach, liver, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, lungs.  Try any of the other organs and see how you do!

Skeleton - we did not do anything with the skeleton, but here is a game to play.  Read the instructions and try to put Mr. Bones back together.

 

 

 

 

 

Simple Machines:

Videos:

This is the video of the Rube Goldberg Machine we watched in class

Here is another video where some young girls build a machine (this is an advertisement)

 

Class Activities and extras:

These are the pages we've used in class:

Inclined Planes

The Wedge

The Wheel and Axle

Levers #1 use the slider bars to try and balance tiny Pic and large Harry on a teeter totter. What do you have to do to get them balanced?

Levers #2 - move the fulcrum and see if Harry discovered the same relationship you did in the lab.

Pulleys

Ramps (Inclined Planes) and Pulleys together

 

Edheads Simple Machines - these are great activities to test your understanding of the simple machines we've been studying. 

Edheads The Compound Machine - learn how forces and simple machines can work together to create The Compound Machine

 

 

Mummification:

 

 

Games and activities:

Micro-organisms:  these are some of the things involved in rotting.  http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/gamesactivities/microorganisms.html

 

 Variables:

Gravity Launch Game:  try to get the spaceship to its' destination.  You can change one variable at a time.  If you need a password to get into the site:  Parkschool:gobruins

Blasto the human cannonball - change the variables to Blasto to hit the target

 

 

 

Figure out your weight on other worlds!

 

 

 

 

Sustainability Unit:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

The Lorax:

 

We start our study of sustainability with reading The Lorax and thinking about the organisms that live in the Lorax's environment; their needs and how they are all interconnected in their environment.

 

 

The Lorax is a fictional story, but there are many real-life examples of the same sort of thing happening to forests and animals and plants. 

 

 

Article about the Cuyahoga River on fire.

 

Many commercials were made at the time to try to raise public awareness about the environment.  One of the most famous was called "the Crying Indian".

Companies started to realize that people had questions about how they were treating the environment and so they started to make commercials like this one.

Woodsy Owl tried getting message across to kids with ads like these two:  Woodsy #1Woodsy talking about water pollution

 

 

To  do for homework:

 you do not have to write anything down, but do look at the site and consider the questions asked below:

 

  • Go to Lorax Project  Click on the Forest picture on the left and read about one of the World’s forests. How is it similar to  what we read about in The Lorax?
  • Check out the “What you can do” How many things are you doing already?
  • the info. and friends sections have some interesting information 
  •  

 

 

Not related to the human body, but because there are so many meteor showers right now I thought you'd enjoy this! 

The Human Body

This page will have ongoing references for our study of some of the systems of the human body and ultimately cells.

 

Digestive System:

 

This is the kooky video that we watched in class.  You drag a food over to the mouth and watch how it travels down the digestive tract.  See what gets broken down and absorbed by the body at each step. How your body digests different foods

 

*****If you were not in class when we watched the video above, this one will be easier to start with.

Another video about the digestive system http://kidshealth.org/kid/htbw/_bfs_DSmoviesource.html

 

More reading on the digestive system (if interested)

 

What does each part do?  - move your mouse over each part of the system to see what it is called and what it does.

 

 

Pathway of digestion quiz    try out this self-test and see how you do with remembering the steps of digestion.

Another digestion game

kids digestion search

 

 

The Lungs and Breathing:

Some information about heart and lungs

 

This page has some other links about the lungs

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks2/science/living_things/

 

http://www.wartgames.com/themes/humanbody/lungs.html

 

Blood and the Bloodmobile:

Today we looked at the make-up of the blood and talked about some of the functions or jobs of the blood in our body. 

  • All of this is summed up in a great song by "They Might Be Giants" called The Bloodmobile.  Watch it again and see if you remember all of the functions it mentions.  Some of these we will return to in more detail as we continue learning about the systems that make up our bodies.
  • Spend some time with the cartoon video below.  It uses lots of terms that you don't need to know, but the general idea of the story is great.  It should give a complete picture about what's happening as the blood moves around your body Cartoon video about the blood and how the heart works.

Cells:  There is another video by the same group that sings about the bloodmobile.  If you're interested it is also fun.

 

Organ systems:

This is the video we watched in class.  It is from the National Geographic and is an overview of some of the systems of the human body.

 

Organs:

  • Organs Game - try this out and see how well you do placing the organs we learned about in class. You will have to rotate them to get them in the proper direction before you can place them.

See if you can correctly place the following:  The heart, stomach, liver, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, lungs.  Try any of the other organs and see how you do!

Skeleton - we did not do anything with the skeleton, but here is a game to play.  Read the instructions and try to put Mr. Bones back together.

 

 

Simple Machines:

 

Inclined Planes:

 

 Inclined Plane:  use this website to explore how less force is needed with longer ramps.

 

Which Wedge is Better? - Try the activity with wedges. Which takes more force - a shorter wedge or a longer wedge (you

lengthen and shorten the wedge by dragging the tip of the wedge found in the box under the data table then click the add mass button) ?

 

Edheads Simple Machines - these are great activities to test your understanding of the simple machines we've been studying.  Start in the house, then when you have completed that move to the garage.

If the link above doesn't work, try starting on this page.

 

Levers:

We have done a lab in class looking at the lever.  In your activity you found that by moving the fulcrum closer to the load you needed less force to move the load.  Here are some activities to further explore the lever, a simple machine.

 

Try to balance Pic and Harry on the see-saw - be patient as it takes a few seconds for them to sort themselves out!

Check out some of these sites/movies about levers, especially levers in your body.

 Try out this lever! 

     1.  Put the fulcrum (the rock) as close to the load (the rectangular block) as possible.  Follow the directions at the site about how to move the fulcrum.  Then move the fulcrum away from the load in short steps, collecting at least 5 data points.

     2.  After you collect your results think about the three questions written in orange:

               a.  As the fulcrum get farther away from the load, what happens to the force Harry needs to move the block? 

               b.  When you move the fulcrum father away from the block of stone (load) what is the  exact distance when Harry can no longer move the block (when the force get too big for him to do the job)?

 

In class we made a first class lever; a lever where the fulcrum is between the force (effort) and the load.  We looked at lots of tools that were different classes/types of levers.

 

Check out this site about levers.

                In a  2nd class lever the load lies between the fulcrum and the force (effort).   An example is a wheelbarrow:  the load lies between the wheel (fulcrum) and the handles (where the force/effort is applied). 

                In a 3rd class lever the force/effort is applied between the fulcrum and the load.  An example is a broom or a hockey stick. 

 

Friction:

Here's a great summary of lots of ideas about motion.  Check out the section on friction and see if it answers any questions for you.

 

Try these Friction activities:

 

Change the surface  Try changing the surface to see how it affects the speed of the car.  Which surface has the least/most friction?  How does the force you use to push the car affect its movement?

 

Explore motion with this fun activity.  You can change the weight of the car, the steepness of the ramp, and introduce extra friction by adding a parachute.  Remember to just change one variable at a time!

 

Here is another friction activity to try.  The goal is to put on the brakes in order to stop a vehicle in a traffic jam.  In it you have a number of different variables (things you can change in the experiment).  You can change the type of vehicle, the speed of the vehicle, the road surface, and the distance at which you apply the brakes.

First try these values:  Big Red Truck, 50 miles per hour, Dry Road, 125 feet away.  You should stop the car.  Now repeat the experiment changing JUST ONE of the values/variables.  What are your results?  Why can't you change more than one thing at a time?

 

Bill Nye Friction Video that we started watching in class

 

 

 

 

Mummification Experiment:                                                

"Why do we mummify cucumbers in fourth grade science"?

 

If you ask students they will say because it's fun, it's cool, we're studying Egypt in class and Egyptians made mummies.

 

From the teachers' point of view the real core of the activity is experimental design; fourth graders are now at the stage

where they can design and carry out an experiment more independently. 

  • As a class we discuss the role of concepts like variables, controls, data, observation and conclusions.
  • Students are asked to use their knowledge and previous experience with fair tests to design a controlled experiment
  • Students choose a variable, set up a controlled experiment, make and record observations, and collect data over a three week period. 
  • At the end of three weeks we evaluate the mummies and compare results, exploring the concept of why we must use percent change rather than just comparing our raw data.
  • Students write up a comprehensive conclusion (their first "lab report") based on their experimental findings.  Students use the writing process, including pre-writing, multiple drafts and peer editing, to produce their final piece.

 

Explore this:

This is a great scholastic article about Mummifying Pets.  Check out the various links

including the digital article and the power point.

*****Mummy Maker - great interactive site that lets you make a mummy.  Along the way you make decisions about what to remove and what to leave behind, tools to use,....

 

There are lots of fun sites about mummification and Ancient Egypt.

*******The Unknown Mummy  a really fun adventure.  You explore a tomb, collect artifacts and then try to figure out whose tomb you're in!

Minding your Mummies: The Science of Mummification 

HowStuffWorks "Egyptian Mummification"

Write your name in hieroglyphics

Fun site with lots of information about Egypt

The Book of The Dead and document preservation

http://www.akhet.co.uk/mainpage.htm

 

 

Sustainability Unit:

In-class activity:  food chains and food webs

 

Food Chains and Food Webs:

 

Biomimicry, form and function!

 

Ecological Footprint:

 

Here is the link for the ecological foot print website.

Here the link to the worksheet and the two additional questions.

 

The Human Body

This page will have ongoing references for our study of some of the systems of the human body and ultimately cells.

 

Not related to the human body, but because there are so many meteor showers right now I thought you'd enjoy this!

 

Digestive System:

 

This is the kooky video that we watched in class.  You drag a food over to the mouth and watch how it travels down the digestive tract.  See what gets broken down and absorbed by the body at each step. How your body digests different foods

 

*****If you were not in class when we watched the video above, this one will be easier to start with.

Another video about the digestive system http://kidshealth.org/kid/htbw/_bfs_DSmoviesource.html

 

More reading on the digestive system (if interested)

 

What does each part do?  - move your mouse over each part of the system to see what it is called and what it does.

 

 

Pathway of digestion quiz    try out this self-test and see how you do with remembering the steps of digestion.

Another digestion game

kids digestion search

 

 

The Lungs and Breathing:

Some information about heart and lungs

 

This page has some other links about the lungs

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks2/science/living_things/

 

http://www.wartgames.com/themes/humanbody/lungs.html

 

 

 

Blood and the Bloodmobile:

Today we looked at the make-up of the blood and talked about some of the functions or jobs of the blood in our body. 

  • All of this is summed up in a great song by "They Might Be Giants" called The Bloodmobile.  Watch it again and see if you remember all of the functions it mentions.  Some of these we will return to in more detail as we continue learning about the systems that make up our bodies.
  • Spend some time with the cartoon video below.  It uses lots of terms that you don't need to know, but the general idea of the story is great.  It should give a complete picture about what's happening as the blood moves around your body Cartoon video about the blood and how the heart works.

Cells:  There is another video by the same group that sings about the bloodmobile.  If you're interested it is also fun.

 

Organ systems:

This is the video we watched in class.  It is from the National Geographic and is an overview of some of the systems of the human body.

 

Organs:

  • Organs Game - try this out and see how well you do placing the organs we learned about in class. You will have to rotate them to get them in the proper direction before you can place them.

See if you can correctly place the following:  The heart, stomach, liver, small intestine, large intestine, kidneys, lungs.  Try any of the other organs and see how you do!

Skeleton - we did not do anything with the skeleton, but here is a game to play.  Read the instructions and try to put Mr. Bones back together.

 

 

 

Simple Machines:

 

Inclined Planes:

 Inclined Plane:  use this website to explore how less force is needed with longer ramps.

Which Wedge is Better? - Try the activity with wedges. Which takes more force - a shorter wedge or a longer wedge (you

lengthen and shorten the wedge by dragging the tip of the wedge found in the box under the data table then click the add mass button) ?

Edheads Simple Machines - these are great activities to test your understanding of the simple machines we've been studying.  Start in the house, then when you have completed that move to the garage./

If the link above doesn't work, try starting on this page.

 

Levers:

We have done a lab in class looking at the lever.  In your activity you found that by moving the fulcrum closer to the load you needed less force to move the load.  Here are some homework activities to further explore the lever, a simple machine.

 

Try to balance Pic and Harry on the see-saw - be patient as it takes a few seconds for them to sort themselves out!

Check out some of these sites/movies about levers, especially levers in your body.

 Try out this lever! 

     1.  Put the fulcrum (the rock) as close to the load (the rectangular block) as possible.  Follow the directions at the site about how to move the fulcrum.  Then move the fulcrum away from the load in short steps, collecting at least 5 data points.

     2.  After you collect your results think about the three questions written in orange:

               a.  As the fulcrum get farther away from the load, what happens to the force Harry needs to move the block? 

               b.  When you move the fulcrum father away from the block of stone (load) what is the  exact distance when Harry can no longer move the block (when the force get too big for him to do the job)?

 

In class we made a first class lever; a lever where the fulcrum is between the force (effort) and the load.  We looked at lots of tools that were different classes/types of levers.

 

Check out this site about levers.

                In a  2nd class lever the load lies between the fulcrum and the force (effort).   An example is a wheelbarrow:  the load lies between the wheel (fulcrum) and the handles (where the force/effort is applied). 

                In a 3rd class lever the force/effort is applied between the fulcrum and the load.  An example is a broom or a hockey stick. 

 

 

Friction:

 

Here's a great summary of lots of ideas about motion.  Check out the section on friction and see if it answers any questions for you.

 

Try these Friction activities:

 

Change the surface  Try changing the surface to see how it affects the speed of the car.  Which surface has the least/most friction?  How does the force you use to push the car affect its movement?

 

Explore motion with this fun activity.  You can change the weight of the car, the steepness of the ramp, and introduce extra friction by adding a parachute.  Remember to just change one variable at a time!

 

Here is another friction activity to try.  The goal is to put on the brakes in order to stop a vehicle in a traffic jam.  In it you have a number of different variables (things you can change in the experiment).  You can change the type of vehicle, the speed of the vehicle, the road surface, and the distance at which you apply the brakes.

First try these values:  Big Red Truck, 50 miles per hour, Dry Road, 125 feet away.  You should stop the car.  Now repeat the experiment changing JUST ONE of the values/variables.  What are your results?  Why can't you change more than one thing at a time?

 

Bill Nye Friction Video that we started watching in class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Mummification Experiment:                                                

"Why do we mummify cucumbers in fourth grade science"?

 

If you ask students they will say because it's fun, it's cool, we're studying Egypt in class and Egyptians made mummies.

 

From the teachers' point of view the real core of the activity is experimental design; fourth graders are now at the stage

where they can design and carry out an experiment more independently. 

  • As a class we discuss the role of concepts like variables, controls, data, observation and conclusions.
  • Students are asked to use their knowledge and previous experience with fair tests to design a controlled experiment
  • Students choose a variable, set up a controlled experiment, make and record observations, and collect data over a three week period. 
  • At the end of three weeks we evaluate the mummies and compare results, exploring the concept of why we must use percent change rather than just comparing our raw data.
  • Students write up a comprehensive conclusion (their first "lab report") based on their experimental findings.  Students use the writing process, including pre-writing, multiple drafts and peer editing, to produce their final piece.

 

Explore this:

This is a great scholastic article about Mummifying Pets.  Check out the various links

including the digital article and the power point.

*****Mummy Maker - great interactive site that lets you make a mummy.  Along the way you make decisions about what to remove and what to leave behind, tools to use,....

 

There are lots of fun sites about mummification and Ancient Egypt.

*******The Unknown Mummy  a really fun adventure.  You explore a tomb, collect artifacts and then try to figure out whose tomb you're in!

Minding your Mummies: The Science of Mummification 

HowStuffWorks "Egyptian Mummification"

Write your name in hieroglyphics

Fun site with lots of information about Egypt

The Book of The Dead and document preservation

http://www.akhet.co.uk/mainpage.htm

 

 

 

Sustainability Unit:

In-class activity:  food chains and food webs

 

Food Chains and Food Webs:

 

 

Biomimicry, Form and Function

 

 

Ecological Footprint:

 

Here is the link for the ecological foot print website.

Here the link to the worksheet and the two additional questions.

  

The Lorax:

 

We start our study of sustainability with reading The Lorax and thinking about the organisms that live in the Lorax's environment; their needs and how they are all interconnected in their environment.

 

 

The Lorax is a fictional story, but there are many real-life examples of the same sort of thing happening to forests and animals and plants. 

 

 

Article about the Cuyahoga River on fire.

 

Many commercials were made at the time to try to raise public awareness about the environment.  One of the most famous was called "the Crying Indian".

Companies started to realize that people had questions about how they were treating the environment and so they started to make commercials like this one.

Woodsy Owl tried getting message across to kids with ads like these two:  Woodsy #1Woodsy talking about water pollution

 

 

To  do for homework:

 you do not have to write anything down, but do look at the site and consider the questions asked below:

 

  • Go to Lorax Project  Click on the Forest picture on the left and read about one of the World’s forests. How is it similar to  what we read about in The Lorax?
  • Check out the “What you can do” How many things are you doing already?
  • the info. and friends sections have some interesting information 

 

 

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